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Call for Papers

Watershed Science Bulletin is the journal of the Center for Watershed Protection Association. This peer-reviewed journal features practical, science-based solutions to watershed and stormwater management issues. Articles are published online quarterly. An Editorial Committee composed of nationally-respected watershed and stormwater management professionals reviews and selects articles for publication based on their quality, presentation of original or novel information, and ability to further the mission of the journal. The Bulletin has an open Call for Papers and article submissions are reviewed on a rolling basis.

Archived issues may be accessed via the link below. All issues prior to the most recent four are now available for free viewing and download. The four most recent issues are available only to CWPA members and OWL subscribers.

Please click here to access archived issues.

 

Mission & Readership

Watershed Science Bulletin is the first publication to directly serve the community of watershed management professionals. These busy professionals typically do not have access to academic research databases for the numerous disciplines that inform watershed and stormwater management. The journal's mission is to synthesize both research and experience from these disciplines and readily transmit this valuable information to those who need it to protect and restore their watersheds. The information provided in the Bulletin is vital to the continuing education of watershed management professionals.


The Bulletin's readership derives from the Center for Watershed Protection's supporters, partners and clients of 20 years. The Center's constituency consists of: municipal government staff from planning, engineering, public works, parks, utilities and other departments; private consultants in engineering, landscape architecture, forestry, and environmental science; community organizations working to implement on-the-ground restoration projects; state and federal government regulators and scientists; and University professors educating others about water issues. Annual page views on the Center websites exceed 800,000.

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Call for Articles Box

The Center for Watershed Protection Association is seeking article submissions for its online journal, the Watershed Science Bulletin. The Bulletin is written for the diverse audience of watershed and stormwater practitioners. Articles selected for publication should illustrate the practical application of science to the broad topic of best practices in stormwater and watershed management. The Bulletin seeks to publish research from a range of landscape settings (e.g. urban, agricultural, arid, coastal, lake). Several specific suggested research themes are provided below as examples:

  • Structural and non-structural stormwater control practices
  • Watershed assessment and planning
  • Pollutant source identification and tracking
  • Monitoring and modeling
  • Water regulations, such as TMDLs, MS4 permits, and wetlands
  • Water policy
  • Climate change and water resources
  • Economics and financing for stormwater and watershed plans and implementation
  • Education and outreach
Article submissions of 5,000 words or less will be accepted on a rolling basis. Selected articles will undergo review by the Editorial Committee who will recommend articles for publication based on their quality, presentation of original information, and ability to further the mission of the journal. Note that acceptance for review does not guarantee that the article will be published.

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Submission Guidelines

Article submissions of 5,000 words or less will be accepted on a rolling basis. Selected articles will undergo peer-review by the Editorial Committee, who will recommend articles for publication based on their quality, presentation of original information, and ability to further the mission of the journal. Note that acceptance for review does not guarantee that the article will be published. If the article is accepted for publication, all authors will be required to sign an Author Agreement to transfer all copyrights in and to the manuscript to the Bulletin. By signing this agreement, the authors certify that the manuscript is an original work that has not been previously published or submitted for publication elsewhere. In exchange, the Bulletin will publish, market, and distribute the article through electronic media. The Bulletin publishes quarterly each year. Each author will receive a complimentary one-year subscription to the Center’s Online Watershed Library, where they will have access to their published article.


Submission Instructions The preferred method of article submission is online at www.cwp.org/submit-an-article/. Articles with file sizes less than 5 MB may also be submitted via e-mail and attached as a Microsoft Word document to bulletin@cwp.org. Along with the article, please complete and submit the article submission form. Graphics may have to be sent in separate emails so that they do not surpass the 5 MB file size limitation. All articles should be 5,000 words or less in length.
SUBMIT

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Editorial Committee

Articles published in the Watershed Science Bulletin are peer-reviewed by an Editorial Committee composed of nationally-respected watershed and stormwater management professionals. The peer-review process is designed to ensure that the Bulletin is a credible, relevant, and valuable resource for its readers.


Meet the Committee

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Current Issue

The Effectiveness of Stormwater BMPs in Reducing Toxic Contaminants in Urban Runoff: A Literature Review for the Chesapeake Bay Watershed

June 2017

Schueler, T.a*, A. Youngk a, L. Williamson b
a Chesapeake Stormwater Network, Ellicott City, MD
b Center for Watershed Protection, Ellicott City, MD
*Corresponding author, watershedguy@hotmail.com

Abstract

Toxic contaminants, such as pesticides, pharmaceuticals, and metals, are of interest to many watershed managers who want to safeguard aquatic and human health. This article summarizes literature findings on the degree to which structural urban best management practices (BMPs) that are currently intended to decrease nutrient and sediment pollution can also reduce toxic contamination of waterways. Such multiple benefits could provide significant cost savings to regulatory agencies, such as the Chesapeake Bay Partnership, that must meet nutrient and sediment total maximum daily loads and also want to reduce toxic contaminants in the water environment. The literature review focused on 12 categories of urban toxic contaminants (UTCs) and involved review of more than 250 research papers and reports. The available data on BMP removal of UTCs was sparse for many of the UTCs. However, sufficient data was available to demonstrate capture and/or retention of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, petroleum hydrocarbons, and urban trace metals (e.g., cadmium, copper lead and zinc) by urban BMPs. The limited available data also provide evidence that these BMPs capture and retain polychlorinated biphenyls, mercury, other trace metals (e.g., arsenic, chromium, iron and nickel), pyrethroid pesticides, legacy organochlorine pesticides, plasticizers and polybrominated diphenyl ether (a flame retardant). Given the limited data available to quantify removal of UTCs by urban BMPs, a key finding from the literature review was that because UTCs have many “sediment-like” properties, a rationale may be provided for using sediment removal rates as the initial benchmark for estimating UTC removal rates by urban BMPs, when little or no monitoring data are available. The article suggests an approach for inferring UTC removal rates based on TSS removal rates. Although the Chesapeake Bay Partnership does not officially regulate toxics, they have adopted the approach recommended here.

 

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